Prognosis of Tanning at a Younger Age

Women Under 40 Who Start Tanning Indoors At A Younger Age;

Tan More Often May Have Higher Melanoma Risk.

 

CBS News (1/27, Marcus) reports on its website that research published in JAMA Dermatology indicated that “women under 40 who started indoor tanning at a younger age and tanned more often have a higher risk of being diagnosed with melanoma.” In an accompanying editorial, “CDC health care economist Gery Guy, Jr., wrote that the new study ‘highlights the need to address indoor tanning among young white women, among whom indoor tanning is most common.’” Guy “said reducing exposure to UV radiation from indoor tanning is pivotal in preventing deadly skin cancer.” According to Guy, “Ongoing surveillance can be used to determine the impact of policies on reducing the use of indoor tanning and the incidence of melanoma.”

 

        MedPage Today (1/27, Bankhead) reports that the study authors, “alluding to the FDA’s proposed ban on use of indoor tanning equipment by people younger than 18,” said, “Our results indicate that these efforts need to be accelerated and expanded beyond bans on minor access to indoor tanning to curb the melanoma epidemic, which seems likely to continue unabated, especially among young women, unless exposure to indoor tanning is further restricted and reduced.”

 

        HealthDay (1/27, Reinberg) reports that investigators looked at “data on nearly 700 men and women ages 25 to 49 who were diagnosed with” melanoma “between 2004 and 2007 and compared them with a similar number of ‘controls.’” The study indicated that “women younger than 40 with melanoma reported starting indoor tanning earlier than women 40 to 49 – at about age 16 versus 25.” Additionally, “younger women with melanoma...reported more tanning sessions than older women – an average of 100 tanning sessions compared with 40 sessions for women diagnosed at 40 to 49.” Also covering the story are HCP Live (1/27, Jacob) and the Daily Mail (1/27, Mailonline).

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